Disassembly and assembly was difficult even under normal conditions. [3], The Reising was made in selective fire versions that could be switched between semi-automatic or full-automatic fire as needed and in semi-auto only versions to be used for marksmanship training and police and guard use. In doing so, Reising contributed to the final design of the US .45 Model 1911 Colt Automatic Pistol, one of the most reliable pistols in history. In this role the weapon proved much more successful, and by doing so, forever mired the weapon in controversy. The adjustable front sight could be lost if the retaining screw wasn't tightly secured. Lastly, the commercial model commonly has a smooth take-down screw, a two-hole trigger guard, and serial numbers ranging from one to 20,000. The Reising was most recently seen in the 2010 HBO Mini-Series The Pacific in Episode 2 being carried by Sgt. Most submachine guns fire from the open bolt position, meaning the full mass of the bolt slams forward when the trigger is pulled; with the closed-bolt system employed by the Reising there is much less movement involving far lighter components, and the resulting improved control in the moment before shooting gives better accuracy, both for semi-automatic and at the onset of full automatic fire. But just when the Reising story seemed to end, a foreign order was received in the 1960s for nearly 2,000 more Model 60s, but that order was finally the end. As a result, the Army didn't adopt the Reising, but the Navy and Marines did, faced with insufficient supply of Thompsons[4], It was far less costly, costing $62 compared to the $200 for the Thompson.

As a result, the Army didn't adopt the Reising, but the Navy and Marines did, faced with insufficient supply of Thompsons[3], It was far less costly, costing $62 compared to the $200 for the Thompson. The weapon was susceptible to jamming if grime clogged the bolt's locking recess in the receiver. This problem was exacerbated by the bolt delay recess in the receiver that accumulated dirt or fouling, preventing the bolt from seating properly; if not seated in its recess, the trigger disconnector prevented firing.

The first and second models are both smooth body, are blued, and are twenty-shot double column. Reising practiced his creed by being an avid shooter and by serving in the early 1900s as an assistant to the distinguished firearm inventor, John M. Browning.

This was followed by an order of 2000 Reising Model 50s …

Myatt, Major Frederick; 1978, Modern Small Arms. The Reising was more balanced than the Thompson because the barrel-and-receiver-group rested concentrically within the stock.

Simple maintenance was problematic as there was no bolt hold-open device. Today, the same weapon would fetch $5,000, a Model 55 in similar condition $6,000, and a Model 60, $2,000. [5], The Reising submachine gun was innovative for its time, and in comparison to its main rival the famous Thompson Model 1928 submachine gun, it possessed similar firepower, better accuracy, excellent balance, light weight, plus a much lower cost and greater ease of manufacture. They were issued along with .30-06 M1917 Enfields and .30-06 Lewis machine guns.

Although mechanically near-identical to the submachine variants, the concept was borne out from H&R's ill-fated .30 carbine light rifle prototype that was trialed against the M1 carbine. At this point the bolt can move to the rear removing the cartridge from the chamber; but the combination of mechanical disadvantage and friction the force of the gases must overcome to push the end of the bolt down means that this action is delayed, allowing pressure in the barrel to drop to a level sufficiently low for safe and efficient cartridge extraction. Quickly despised by front-line Marines, Lieutenant Colonel Merritt A. Edson, Commander, 1st Marine Raider Battalion, ordered that Reisings be flung into Guadalcanal's crocodile infested Lunga River, as his troops resorted to reliable bolt-action Springfield rifles. They often have an adjustable front sight with an Allen screw and a rear sight with a retaining screw. Two companies of Marine paratroopers also used Model 55s, to attack the island of Gavutu, between Tulagi and Tanambogo.

These stocks are distinguished from originals by their wider than normal sling swivels and buttstocks, by the fact they have no stock ties, and have H&R marked plastic buttplates (originals were unmarked metal).[2]. Thousands more Reisings were purchased by the U.S. Coast Guard or sent to our British, Canadian, and Soviet allies under our Lend-Lease plan. Especially weapons designated Curio and Relic (C&R) as Reisings are by the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. In this role, Reising contributed to the final design of the US .45 Colt M1911 pistol. Produced throughout the war, Reisings saw service in both the Pacific and European theaters, with security personnel domestically, and with law enforcement and correctional agencies after the war.

[18], Robert C. Ankony, "The US .45 Model 50 and 55 Reising submachine gun and Model 60 Semiautomatic Rifle,", "Latest Submachine Gun is Designed for Mass Production", "Latest Submachine Gun Is Designed For Mass Production", Army News, benefits, careers, entertainment, photos, promotions - Army Times HOME, http://www.thememoryproject.com/digital-archive/profile.cfm?cnf=cf&collectionid=763, "Financial Assessment of Military Small Arms"--see items 3 and esp., 14 on the Reising submachine gun, History of the Reising Model 50 Submachine Gun, "Latest Submachine Gun Is Designed for Mass Production", Ankony, Robert C. "The US .45 Model 50 and 55 Reising Submachine Gun and Model 60 Semiautomactic Rifle. Joe, try going on e-bay, key in the search word reising.

It was accepted, and in March 1941, H&R started manufacturing the Model 50 full stocked submachine gun. Production of the Model 50 and 55 submachine guns ceased in 1945 at the end of World War II. Nearly 120,000 submachine guns were made of which two thirds went to the Marines. Although the Thompson submachine gun was available, this weapon frequently proved too heavy and bulky for jungle patrols, and initially it too was in short supply. Nelson, Thomas and Daniel Musgrave; 1980, The World's Machine Pistols and Submachine Guns.

It was accepted, and in March 1941, H&R started manufacturing the Model 50 full stocked submachine gun. Virginia: T.B.N. [8][9] Most Reisings were originally issued to Marine officers and NCOs in lieu of a compact and light carbine, since the M1 carbine was not yet being issued to the Marines. Reising practiced his creed by being an avid shooter and by serving in the early 1900s as an assistant to the firearm inventor, John M. Browning. The gun quickly became despised by front-line Marines, and Lieutenant Colonel Merritt A. Edson, Commander, 1st Marine Raider Battalion, ordered that Reisings be flung into Guadalcanal's crocodile infested Lunga River, as his troops resorted to reliable bolt-action Springfield rifles. [6], During World War II, the Reising first saw action on August 7, 1942, exactly eight months to the day after Pearl Harbor, when 11,000 men from the 1st Marine Division stormed the beaches of Guadalcanal, just south of the equator in the Solomon Islands. Over 100,000 Reisings were ordered during World War II, and were initially used by the United States Navy, Marine Corps and the United States Coast Guard, though some were shipped to Canadian, Soviet, and other allied forces to fight the Axis powers.[1]. [9] This was in part due to its overly complex delayed-blowback design.

[2], Though described as a submachine gun, the Reising was actually designed as a compact lightweight semi-automatic carbine that was also capable of fully automatic fire.

; 1973, Pictorial History of the Sub-Machine Gun. This sweltering ninety-mile long mountainous island was covered with dense jungle and swamps, and was defended by Japanese troops.

", Jones, Charles, "Lore of the Corps: Reisings Found to be Unreliable in Combat,".

As a result, the Army didn't adopt the Reising, but the Navy and Marines did, faced with insufficient supply of Thompsons. United States Marine Corps; 1942, Manual for the Reising Submachine Gun, Caliber .45, Models 50, 55, and 60.