C1790 Air Suspension LR Air Spring Solenoid Output Circuit Failure – This code indicates an issue with the solenoid at the rear driver side of your air strut. For this reason, the compressor often goes out in air suspension systems.

Over time, these components simply just wear down from doing their job. This is usually replaced with air compressor pump as a whole unit. They puncture and crack like anything else made from rubber or plastic. Pry off the fuse panel cover and find the blown fuse. If it runs too loud or too long (more than about 10 seconds), it likely needs service or replacement. This genuine Strutmasters conversion kit allows owners to convert their Navigator suspension to sturdy, dependable coils for less than $600. Hunting it down is as simple as letting your vehicle raise to its factory height, and spraying down your air struts, springs and lines with soapy water. A leaky air bag doesn’t just affect your ride comfort. C1760 Air Suspension Rear Height Sensor High Signal Circuit Failure – This code indicates an issue with the rear level sensors, either the sensors themselves failing, or dethatching from the ball joint holding them in place. Unfortunately, in addition to being a common issue, the compressor is also one of the most expensive components to replace. Another common issue is the vehicle sections sitting at different heights, like the front sitting higher than the rear, or one side is lower than the other. © 2020 Suspension Experts, LLC. Therefore, when other components are failing and the compressor tries to pick up the slack, it significantly shortens its own working life. The only way to really test these sensors at home is to visually inspect them. Due to their nature, the failure of one or more components in your air suspension is inevitable. Owning a 2003 to 2006 Lincoln Navigator or Ford Expedition can come with its share of problems, and the air ride suspension is definitely one of the bigger headaches these vehicle owners face. See if the problem is as simple as a blown fuse. It generates the pressurized air that’s used to inflate the system and pushes it to the air bags. C1726 Air Suspension Rear Pneumatic Failure – This code indicates an air issue with the rear of your suspension. It’s important to note that when one air bag goes out, the others are soon to follow.

If you take your Navigator into the mechanic for an air suspension failure, nine times out of 10, the air bags will be the first thing they check. To submit your questions or ideas, or to simply learn more about It Still Works, contact us. If you take your Navigator into the mechanic for an air suspension failure, nine times out of 10, the air bags will be the first thing they check. Suncore Industries, LLC. These sensors determine how much each air bag needs to be inflated for the car to maintain its ride height. First disconnect the negative battery cable. Like the air bags, these will likely fail at about the same rate as each other. This may be difficult without a true lift to use at home. It’s important to note that when one air bag goes out, the others are soon to follow.
Boynton Beach, Florida An alternative is to just ditch that air suspension altogether and convert to an old-school coilover system. Listen to your compressor cycles. allows owners to convert their Navigator suspension to sturdy, dependable coils for less than $600. First, know that it’s not just you. Alternatively, if you have a New Generation Star Tester (NGS) diagnostic tool, you can connect it to the data link connector and if you retrieve the diagnostic trouble codes C1725, air suspension front pneumatic failure, or C1726, air suspension rear pneumatic failure, you can be sure you have a height level sensor or linkage arm issue. Instructions are included and we’ve also posted a handy installation video to help out!

See if the problem is as simple as a blown fuse.

Without a working compressor, you don’t have an air suspension. It has a limited lifespan.