“Many things have been taken out of context,” the statement said. [6] Co-author of the National Health and Medical Research Council's Australian infant feeding guidelines, Professor Jane Scott, has stated this advice is "definitely not safe," and that "there is a real danger here for infants as these will not support healthy growth and development". [1][5][9] She urged her clients to treat their cancer with baking soda wraps[1][6] and claimed, without evidence, that one doctor had cured 90% of his patients' cancer with baking soda injections. A complaint made to Acnc investigators and seen by Guardian Australia alleges the Misty Mountain Health Retreat’s activities are outside the legal requirements for a health promotion charity, given it “operates what is effectively a wellness holiday resort”. “The clients are at risk if they act on it.”. She believes in giving the body optimum conditions in order for it to heal itself. The Acnc website states the legal meaning of ‘health promotion charity’ is a charitable institution whose principal activity is to promote the prevention or the control of diseases in humans. [1], On September 24, 2019, The HCCC indefinitely banned O'Neill from providing health services, regardless of whether or not she accepted payment for doing so. An Australian naturopath who advised clients that their cancer was a fungal infection and could be cured using bicarbonate of soda has been banned from practicing for life by the New South Wales Health Care Complaints Commission. Naturopath Barbara O’Neill has been banned in Australia for spreading dangerous lies about health. the Health Care Complaints Commission found, most recent financial report states that the charity operates live-in health centres. “Misty Mountain Health Retreat’s unqualified staff give its clients erroneous advice,” the complaint, made by the dietician and nutritionist Mandy-Lee Noble, alleges. Sodium bicarbonate. [6] She has told pregnant women it is unnecessary to take antibiotics for Strep B because "no baby has ever died from Strep B catching out of birth". O’Neill did not respond to the questions, and instead sent a screenshot of a letter from an Aboriginal woman, who Guardian Australia has not named, from Port Macquarie who said she did casual work at the retreat. Shares. [6][7], She is married to Michael O'Neill, the founder of the Informed Medical Options Party. [1], Following the decision, a petition was circulated calling for the HCCC to reverse its decision. We must ensure the Cook Islands population remains safe. [2][8], Although O'Neill has promoted her services as a naturopath, nutritionist, and health educator since at least 2004,[3] she lacks relevant credentials. As an Acnc-registered health promotion charity, Misty Mountain Health Retreat receives government grants and various tax concessions. [6], O'Neill discouraged immunisation, claiming that vaccines are unnecessary. [11], Although she has been banned from providing health advice in Australia, O'Neill's website states that "Barbara O’Neill, author, educator, naturopath and nutritionist (retired), is… available for public speaking to companies, community groups, or churches outside of Australia and is sure to please those looking for motivation to live a longer, healthier and happier life. [10], In late 2019, O’Neill and her husband’s Misty Mountain Health Retreat came under investigation by the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission (ACNC) for alleged breaches of charity law. These have included unpasteurised goat milk[3][5] and a mix of almond milk and dates or bananas. [13] The retreat charges up to AUD$3,100 a week for health and cancer "treatments". In general, if the material is accessible in [those jurisdictions] online, then it is considered to be delivering a health service.”, Barbara O’Neill issued a statement published by an online petition that has been launched in support of her work. Clients can pay for additional treatments including an $85 facial or $100 per hour colonic irrigation. “There are many in our community that owe there [sic] improved health to Misty and Barbara [O’Neill]. “It looks a bit dark now, but the Great God of the Universe will not let His wonderful health truth to be eliminated, regardless of how men and women may try.”. Oct 8, 2018 - Explore Pam Carter's board "Barbara ONeill", followed by 184 people on Pinterest. “We will not be responding to any other negative messages.”. [9] The HCCC opened an investigation into O'Neill and an interim prohibition order was placed on her whilst the probe was undertaken. [5][7][9] However, the Royal Australian College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists' statistics show that 14% of newborns who contract early-onset Strep B die, and that antibiotics can reduce this risk dramatically. At one point, the charity also offered clients helicopter rides. [5][7][9] She has previously provided health retreats and wellness programs in Australia and the Cook Islands[4][12] and continues to conduct them in New Zealand and the U.S.[5][13], According to the HCCC investigation, O'Neill falsely claimed to be able to cure cancer and urged patients not to use chemotherapy. [6] In one of her YouTube videos, she stated that "children can be naturally vaccinated against tetanus by drinking plenty of water, going to bed early, not eating junk food and running around the hills". She believes in giving the body optimum conditions in order for it to heal itself. [5][7], The HCCC also found that O'Neill cannot recognise and provide health advice within the limits of her training and experience,[1] and had not maintained records of the advice she provided to clients. In a response seen by Guardian Australia, the retreat told McLeod “the whole story is not being told to the public”. [3][5] Her speaking venues have included Seventh-day Adventist Church events. [5] The HCCC further concluded that "Mrs O'Neill does not recognise that she is misleading vulnerable people including mothers and cancer sufferers by providing very selective information." The Misty Mountain Health Retreat does not appear to engage in any of those activities. Australian charities watchdog is looking into numerous complaints about the Misty Mountain Health Retreat, Last modified on Thu 10 Oct 2019 13.01 EDT. [5][7] According to O'Neill's website, she provided detox services claiming to aid in recovery from heart disease, diabetes, hormonal imbalance, chronic fatigue, candida/fungus, drug addiction, cancer, heartburn, and obesity. "[10], This article is about the Australian naturopath. [4][5], O'Neill claimed that she was merely providing clients with information, rather than advice. “Michael O’Neill has shown me your email questions where you are trying to put Misty Mountain Health Retreat in a bad light,” she wrote. "[3] The month following the HCCC's decision, O'Neill was scheduled to conduct a wellness program in the US at a cost of $2,350 per person.[5]. The HCCC determined O’Neill to be a risk to the health and safety of members of the public. The O’Neills did not respond to questions on how these purchases were used by the charity. It further concluded: "The misinformation has huge potential to have a detrimental effect on the health of individuals as Mrs O’Neill discourages mainstream treatment for cancer, antibiotics and vaccination." "[4] Violating the ban could be punished with a prison sentence of up to six months. Under its health promotion charity status, the Retreat had received government grants and various tax concessions. Barbara O'Neill - world renown, much loved and highly respected Nutritionist and Health Director from Misty Mountain Health Retreat is in crisis right now, with the HCCC prohibiting her to practice or speak, following false allegations from 2 people involved in a political difference with Barbara's husband Michael O'Neill, for his involvement in a party that opposes compulsory medication. Barbara O'Neil (parfois créditée Barbara O'Neill) est une actrice américaine, née à Saint-Louis (Missouri) le 17 juillet 1910, morte à Cos Cob (Greenwich, Connecticut) le 3 septembre 1980. Barbara is available for public speaking to companies, community groups, or churches outside of Australia and is sure to please those looking for motivation to live a longer, healthier and happier life. melissa.davey@theguardian.com, Naturopath who said bicarbonate soda cures cancer banned for life by health watchdog, Homeopathy not effective for treating any condition, Australian report finds. [6], O'Neill also states that parents should not feed their children solid food or grains until their molars have emerged. Noble’s complaint alleges that Michael O’Neill’s involvement with an anti-vaccination political party was a conflict of interest with health promotion. The party is anti-vaccination and is sceptical of conventional, evidence-based medicine. “Thank you all for the wonderful love and support that you have given through this challenging time,” she said. “How could Living Springs continue to provide O’Neill’s seminars in light of their knowledge of the Health Care Complaints Commission findings. Good for baking, but not for curing cancer. Earlier in October the Health Care Complaints Commission found O’Neill told people the debunked theory that their cancer was a fungus that could be cured with bicarbonate soda rather than through conventional medical treatment, and gave misleading and dangerous pregnancy and child-rearing advice through her seminars, website, online lectures and consultations with clients. The Health Care Complaints Commission investigation into Barbara O’Neill found health lectures given by her, which are promoted by the Misty Mountain Health Retreat, include recommendations not to vaccinate, to use alternative therapies in the place of conventional treatments for cancer and to follow alternative feeding guidelines for infants that are known to be harmful and potentially fatal. This article is more than 1 year old. Its most recent financial report states that the charity operates live-in health centres in New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland where Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and people with chronic and terminal illnesses receive diet, exercise and health advice. The charity has held various names since its registration in 2012 including the Misty Mountain Aboriginal Healing Place and the Misty Mountain Health and Education Institute. Their annual statements for 2014-2017 list government grants totalling $6,440. The Misty Mountain Health Retreat charity affiliated with Barbara O’Neill is being investigated by the Australian Charities and Not-for-Profits Commission. Barbara is passionate about good health and natural healing. McLeod described the response as “unconscionable”. [9] Accompanying the petition, is a statement from O'Neill: “It looks a bit dark now, but the Great God of the Universe will not let His wonderful health truth to be eliminated, regardless of how men and women may try.”[4] Since the ban, O'Neill has claimed she is a victim of a Nazi-style propaganda campaign. Barbara is passionate about good health and natural healing. The program costs US$2,350 [AU$3,500]. As examples of activities that align with this definition, the Acnc lists raising public awareness of a disease, undertaking medical research, developing or providing aids or equipment, and providing clients and carers with evidence-based health education. When the HCCC noted these facts to O'Neill, she stated that she still intended to use their advice. The ban followed an HCCC investigation which found she lacked any health related qualifications, a degree, diploma, or membership in an accredited health organisation. Barbara O’Neill, author, educator, and an international speaker at large on natural self-healing. He also stated, "In general, if the material is accessible in [those jurisdictions] online, then it is considered to be delivering a health service", and that "Presenting health education in any form or delivering health services, would be a breach of her prohibition order. This article is more than 1 year old. In October 2019, the Cook Islands Secretary of Health Josephine Aumea Herman expressed concern after learning O’Neill had been running health workshops in Rarotonga, and referred the matter onto the chief medical officer of the Cook Islands.