It is regarded as an important early work of American feminist literature for its illustration of the attitudes towards mental and physical health of women in the 19th century. John, the narrator's physician husband, describes her mental illness as "temporary nervous depression" but she feels her illness is more serious. In the story "The Yellow Wallpaper," describe the room that the narrator was in. John doesn't give the narrator any control over the treatment of her illness. In The Yellow Wallpaper, the male influences of John, and the narrator's brother dictate her diagnosis and situation. In this story, mental illness is represented as something that is improperly understood, diagnosed, and treated. When the narrator suggests that John remove the yellow wallpaper in her room because it makes her feel uncomfortable, John refuses. Why or why not. 61–77. According to Vergona's analysis of The Yellow Wallpaper, the narrator's solitary state leads her to insanity. The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Gilman, depicts the progression of the narrator's mental illness from the first person perspective of her journal. John dismissed the narrator's concerns as women's speech. In this sense, The Yellow Wallpaper serves as an allegory as to the importance of taking women's speech seriously. The narrator's identity isn't revealed in The Yellow Wallpaper, but she can be identified as a women with a mental illness. Top subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences, Latest answer posted January 11, 2009 at 9:56:12 AM, Latest answer posted March 24, 2011 at 6:41:08 PM, Latest answer posted March 28, 2020 at 7:15:29 AM, Latest answer posted October 02, 2017 at 12:39:18 AM, Latest answer posted September 03, 2017 at 12:18:22 PM. According to Treichler's article Escaping the Sentence: Diagnosis and Discourse in The Yellow Wallpaper, the yellow wallpaper is a metaphor for women's speech. Vergona believes that John's treatment of the narrator, including his refusal to remove the yellow agitated the narrator's mental illness. When she tries to explain to him how she feels, he makes light of her thoughts, obviously convinced that, because he is a physician, he knows what's... (The entire section contains 3 answers and 685 words.). Treichler says, “I use ‘diagnosis,’ then as a metaphor for the voice of medicine or science that speaks to define a women’s condition.” In the late 1800s, when The Yellow Wallpaper takes place, men controlled the institutions of science and medicine. In the 18th century, this type of illness was categorized as one of the nervous diseases. ©2020 eNotes.com, Inc. All Rights Reserved, What is the central theme or the main theme of "The Yellow Wallpaper?". Vergona argues that the narrator's imprisoned state as a woman leads to her to insanity and ultimately tearing down the wallpaper. eNotes.com will help you with any book or any question. Has she committed suicide? As part of the narrator's regimen she is prevented from speaking about the severity of her illness. 1/2, 1984, pp. ©2020 eNotes.com, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Already a member? Top subjects are Literature, History, and Law and Politics, Latest answer posted March 24, 2011 at 6:41:08 PM, Latest answer posted October 02, 2017 at 12:39:18 AM, Latest answer posted July 13, 2018 at 6:44:19 AM, Latest answer posted September 10, 2017 at 1:21:04 PM, Latest answer posted September 29, 2019 at 6:53:16 PM. Treichler, Paula A. Can we believe everything that she says? This is absolutely true in the case of The Yellow Wallpaper. JSTOR, JSTOR, Vergona, Laura. Top subjects are Literature, History, and Business. Treichler says, "Because she does not feel free to speak truthfully 'to a living soul' she confides her thoughts to a journal- 'dead paper'- instead." Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Despite the narrator's pleas, that she has a more serious illness, John refuses to alter his course of treatment. Who are the experts?Our certified Educators are real professors, teachers, and scholars who use their academic expertise to tackle your toughest questions. Who are the experts?Our certified Educators are real professors, teachers, and scholars who use their academic expertise to tackle your toughest questions. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime. Log in here. Can we believe everything that she says? In The Yellow Wallpaper the narrator suggests that she believes that John's diagnosis of her was incorrect. Toward the end of the story the narrator becomes convinced that there is a women trapped inside of the wall paper. The narrator's identity isn't revealed in The Yellow Wallpaper, but she can be identified as a women with a mental illness. Why does the nameless narrator "creep"? Instead of speaking freely to her husband John, that she believes her condition is more serious than temporary nervous depression, she confides these personal thoughts to her private journal. Her husband believes that it is only a "temporary nervous depression—a slight hysterical tendency." Though John seems like the obvious villain of “The Yellow Wallpaper,” the story does not allow us to see him as wholly evil. Log in here. The wallpaper makes the narrator feel uncomfortable, but as a male authority figure John has the final say over the wallpaper. Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s classic short story, "The Yellow Wallpaper" tells the story of a young woman’s gradual descent into psychosis. The front pattern does move - and no wonder! Vergona says, "Instead of working with her towards getting better, he isolated her as if she needed to be alone to get better," Vergona continues, "I believe that being alone was the problem for her.". "The Yellow Wallpaper" by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, published 1892 in The New England Magazine. After tearing down the wallpaper and stepping over John's unconscious body the narrator is able to speak freely of her diagnosis and illness. According to Laura Vergona in her blog titled Analysis of The Yellow Wallpaper Through the Psychoanalysis and Feminist Lens, "Women have been restrained by the image that women are helpless, and that men know what is ultimately best for them." The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Gilman, depicts the progression of the narrator's mental illness from the first person perspective of her journal. The rest cure, then, called for perfect and complete "rest": no reading, no writing, no working, really, no thinking. To suggest that a woman who suffers from postpartum depression, for which they did not have a name or concept, should be whisked away from family and friends and confined in solitude to a bedroom is more than ridiculous: it seems tantamount to torture.